Watch As This Crowd Of 65,000 Sings “Bohemian Rhapsody” Perfectly In Unison


This impromptu group even hummed the guitar solo without missing a beat! This video gave me goosebumps, it was so good.

In a bit of twist, the crowd became the opening act at a sold-out concert in London.

More than 65,000 people were waiting for Green Day to perform at Hyde Park in July when Queen’s “Bohemian Rhapsody” came over the loudspeakers.

In a moment that would have made the guys of “Wayne’s World” proud, the crowd launched into an impromptu singalong.

Green Day shared the video from the Revolution Radio Tour on YouTube.

After nailing just about every section of the six-minute suite, the crowd couldn’t help but give themselves a much-deserved round of applause.

The video below is recorded from the stage and it perfectly captures the crowd’s rendition of the masterpiece.

For anyone who is a fan of the song and love to sing it, the video is sure to give you a special feeling. Many viewers even commented how the video has brought them to tears.

One view commented saying, “It’s just so emotional because all those thousands people who don’t know each other, are just unified by music.”

Queen frontman Freddie Mercury said he faced a lot of pushback when the group initially tried to release the song in 1975.

“People were all going, ‘You’re joking, they’ll never play it, you’ll only hear the first few bars and then they’ll fade it out.’ We had numerous rows,” Mercury said in a 1976 interview with “Sounds.” “We knew it was very risky, but we had so much confidence in that song — I did anyway.”

“Bohemian Rhapsody” went on to become the U.K.’s third-best-selling single of all time, and more than 40 years later, people are still rocking out to it.

The most famous lyrics in the song for some people are the words below:

“Is this the real life? Is this just fantasy?
Caught in a landslide, no escape from reality
Open your eyes, look up to the skies and see
I’m just a poor boy, I need no sympathy
Because I’m easy come, easy go, little high, little low
Any way the wind blows doesn’t really matter to me, to me…”